Tag: Pinchle Janam De Mel

Trousseau Time

14Mar

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By @Raj Thandhi

Although I have no plans to re-marry in the future lately I’ve found myself quite intrigued with Indian bridal wear and trousseau options. Maybe it’s all the “shaadi” related films like Band Baja Barat and Tanu weds Manu, or my upcoming 10th anniversary (and secret desire for a vow renewal – does anyone know if the gurudwara allows that?) One thing is for sure; I’ve got bridal brain.

I got married in 2001, when designer Indian wear was still a distant dream for a girl in Vancouver. It was starting to come through in bridal magazines and specialty boutiques, but it wasn’t quite mainstream enough for me to find it. And like many young brides I didn’t even have a well defined style at the time, so I just picked what I thought was the prettiest. Don’t get me wrong, I loved my wedding lehnga, but a girl can still dream right? So here I’ve compiled my favorite Indian bridal wear designers in 2011:

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Tarun Tahiliani

Tarun Tahiliani is the master of classic Indian looks. He is most famous for his sari designs (he created the infamous pink and blue bandini sari for Elizabeth Hurley), but I’m obsessed with his formal lehngas.

Tahiliani’s bridal collecion tends to have a more traditional look and is saturated with rich tones like red, burgundy, gold, and fuschia. I love how he goes over the top in a very classy way with beads, sequins, and semi-precious stones. A great example of his all out bridal wear is the sari he designed for Shilpa Shetty’s wedding . If I had to choose a bridal look today, Tahiliani would be my first choice.

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Masaba Gupta

The youngest designer on my list, Masaba is also the most refreshing. I love how she creates Indian looks with a modern twist. My favorite part of her aesthetic is the colour pallets she selects; canary yellows, deep aubergine and aqua, bottle green and red, they remind me of classic, old-school India.

I would totally rock a lehnga by Gupta at any pre-wedding event, but my current favorite is her colour blocked and sheer sari combinations. The are just the right amount of playful and pretty with a little bit of quirky thrown in.

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Manish Malhotra

B-towns best known (and maybe safest) designer is still one of my favs. Although I find some of his designs too basic, sometimes simply understated is perfect. Well known as in-house designer for the Kapoor sisters, Malhotra has mastered the simple salwar kameez, and owns the anarkali market.

My only issue with Manisha Malhotra designs is the velvet; sometimes he just goes too far with it (As seen here on Ash) That being said I think an outfit by Malhotra would be perfect for a pre-wedding dinner, or simple engagement ceremony. His looks are easily identifiable, Bollywood worthy, and very appropriate for impressing the future mother-in-law.

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Sabyasachi Mukherji

The first Indian designer ever invited to show at Milan Fashion week, Sabyasachi is a design innovator. I love that his collections are cohesive but they never look cookie-cutter. Each piece has it’s own personality and flavor. I absolutely adore his sari’s (and can’t believe I don’t own one)! Sabyasachi sari’s are defined by unusual fabrics and textures, detailing, vibrant colours, and a sort of patchwork look.

Personally, I feel like these are the best new “bahu” saris on the market. A signature Sabya with a few bangles and some statement earrings from Amrita Singh and you can’t go wrong.

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Pria Kataria Puri

I’m not a huge fan of Pria’s Indian wear, but her resort collection is amazing! If I were going to honeymoon on a beach somewhere I would be all over her kaftan’s, tunics, and Georgette dresses. Honestly, before I found Puri’s designs I hadn’t ever taken an interest in resort wear, but suddenly I’m craving a lakeside retreat.

@RajThandhi is a blogger here on Urban Desi Radio, you can check out her personally blog here! Interested in blogging for UDR? email us urbandesiradio[@]gmail.com

Gone With The Wind – The Facebook De-Friend

3Mar

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reenadotme@gmail.com

Ever been friend dumped? I have. Well, sort of. It wasn’t so much an abrupt termination, as it was a slow, putrid demise of a maleficent mound of mulch. Being “dumped” by this particular friend was not exactly devastating because, in truth this person was, hmmm, how should I say? Toxic. And really, he/she/it was more of a fair weather type of friend. The end was right in front of us, but I had too much indifference respect for the past friendship to pound that final nail in the coffin. Now, although my friend dump was some time ago, the issue recently resurfaced as I was comparing notes with my friend D, who’s been newly friend-dumped. He, unfortunately, is not taking the friend dump in stride. He’s pissed and confused. D’s case is different. He didn’t see this coming. He thought things were “fine”. He was Facebook de-friended. I feel for him. It’s never easy getting dumped.

Anyhow, the point is, we started to compare notes. Where did the friendships go sour? Was there a pinpoint-able spot to lay blame upon? Was one person clearly in the wrong? Was proper friend-dumping etiquette followed? Is there proper friend-dumping etiquette? The more we discussed the phenomenon the more we realized that, compared to being dumped by a lover, friend-dumping is generally FAR more passive. While both can clearly occur in passive-aggressive manners, romantic dumping is more on the active end of the spectrum, and friend-dumping on the passive end. The “talk” happens far more consistently with the breakup of a romance. There is rarely an, “It’s not you, it’s me,” moment in a friend-dump.

Even less common, is the passive-aggressive behavior of the dumper who acts like such an ass that the intended dumpee becomes the actual dumper. It seems most friend-dumps come in a slower, passive manner, proceeding to passive-agressive behavior. Phone calls are returned with less verve. Plans are cancelled at the last minute, with increasing frequency. Text message responses such as “cool”, or “ok” become the norm. And then comes the green mile. You notice, first, that you have limited access to the dumper’s Facebook profile. It’s ok. Maybe they just limited their profile to everyone, you tell yourself. Then comes the inability to see any current pictures or status updates. And then, the de-friend.

Personally, I find the Facebook de-friend to be a tacky, worm-like way of weaseling out of a friendship you no longer wish to be a part of, (I’m referring to once meaningful friendships, and not a casual acquaintance.) If there was no head-to-head, no major blowout, then be a fricken adult, grow a set, and just talk to your intended dumpee. Maybe they did something that legitimately crossed a line. Or maybe you are just bored of them. Whatever it is, what the hell does it say about you that you can’t directly offer an explanation as to why you’ve been m.i.a. all of a sudden? It is the romantic equivalent of Berger’s post-it note. If the best you can do is slowly faze them off your Facebook page, you are a Class A douche, and deserve to be branded.

In D’s case it is clear, to me at least, that D was a perceived threat to his dumper. So, actually, D should be laughing at this pathetic dimwit, and I reckon, after our little pow wow, he soon will be. Frankly, if a once “real” friend de-friended me on Facebook as a way to declare the time of death, it would only reinforce the caliber of lame loser I was “losing”.

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Caravan Crookz OFFICIAL Bhangra Video

28Feb

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It’s easy to get caught up in the negative aspects of the music scene, whether you are a journalist or an artist. From a journalist point of view, it seems like the story sells when it’s a bare knuckle brawl fight between two people or he said she said bullshit. I can always count on Caravan Crookz to bring us and show us a HUMOROUS side of the scene, you’re probably wondering, what does humor have to do with making good music? A lot – it gives us something to laugh at and to not take ourselves seriously. I strongly believe, if we don’t laugh at ourselves, we are bound to die of constipation (what a horrible death) but it’s true. Humor is a valid emotion like anger or sadness. This kind of takes me back to the Goodness Gracious Me days!

Bol Punjab De Live Session at Ladla Studios

28Feb

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Bol Punjab De and Ladla don’t have time to watch the Oscars, they are busy in the studio recording some potential Oscar winning tracks for the Bhangra side of the Bay! Check out this live session with Ladla. Harvi on the keys with Ladla and Nix, trying some new ideas for upcoming tune “pichle janam de mel” any suggestions? It looks like they will be pulling a all nighter at the studio, so hit them up at Bol Punjab De.